The Last Man on Earth – the story of Leendert Hasenbosch

I listed previously the names of some famous marooned individuals here.

You can read more details about poor sailor Leendert in this article http://m.himalmag.com/hell-ascension/. The Dutch state was unforgiving when it came to punishing homosexuals; and Leendert was extremely unlucky to find himself on this waterless island in the summer.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: Postapocalypse, Writing

The Last Man on Earth – the story of Leendert Hasenbosch

I listed previously the names of some famous marooned individuals here.

You can read more details about poor sailor Leendert in this article http://m.himalmag.com/hell-ascension/. The Dutch state was unforgiving when it came to punishing homosexuals; and Leendert was extremely unlucky to find himself on this waterless island in the summer.


Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: Postapocalypse, Writing

The Wisdom of the Dakota Indians – how to Ride a Dead Horse

The Dakota Indians say that when you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount. However, in business, education, government, and in the home, a range of far more advanced strategies are being deployed. So, when you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to:

  • Buy a stronger whip.
  • Change riders.
  • Threaten to fire the horse.
  • Harness several dead horses together to increase speed.
  • Appoint a committee to study the horse.
  • Proclaim: “This is the way we’ve always ridden this horse.”
  • Develop a training session to improve riding ability.
  • Update the manual.
  • Lower the standards of what defines a living horse, so that dead horses are included.
  • Reclassify the horse as “living-impaired.”
  • Reclassify the horse as “temporarily out of order.”
  • Get more experts to investigate the dead horse. Fire those that claim the horse is dead.
  • Proclaim that others ride exactly this type of horse successfully.
  • Proclaim that riders that refuse to ride the dead horse are lazy, have no ambition and are not “all-in” – then replace them.
  • Reminisce elaborately on all the good times you had while riding that horse.
  • Hire consultants.
  • Proclaim boldly: “This horse is not dead, but alive!”
  • Hire more consultants.
  • Increase funding and/or training to increase the dead horse’s performance.
  • Ride the dead horse “outside the box.”
  • Make the dead horse shareholder. Threaten to cur the horse’s bonus.
  • Get the horse a Web site and social media visibility.
  • Kill all the other horses so the dead one doesn’t stand out.
  • Pronounce that the dead horse doesn’t need food, water or care, carries lower overhead and is less costly, and therefore contributes substantially more to the bottom line than other horses.
  • Rewrite the performance requirements for all horses.
  • Promote the dead horse to a supervisory position.
  • Name the dead horse, “paradigm shift” and keep riding it.
  • Ride the dead horse “smarter, not harder.”
  • Call the dead horse “Innovate” and keep on riding it.
  • Point out that the dead horse produces less manure and thus fewer climate damaging gasses. Keep on riding it.
  • Declare “God told us to ride this horse.”
  • Hire more consultants.

Filed under: Uncategorized

The Wisdom of the Dakota Indians – how to Ride a Dead Horse

The Dakota Indians say that when you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount. However, in business, education, government, and in the home, a range of far more advanced strategies are being deployed. So, when you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to:

  • Buy a stronger whip.
  • Change riders.
  • Threaten to fire the horse.
  • Harness several dead horses together to increase speed.
  • Appoint a committee to study the horse.
  • Proclaim: “This is the way we’ve always ridden this horse.”
  • Develop a training session to improve riding ability.
  • Update the manual.
  • Lower the standards of what defines a living horse, so that dead horses are included.
  • Reclassify the horse as “living-impaired.”
  • Reclassify the horse as “temporarily out of order.”
  • Get more experts to investigate the dead horse. Fire those that claim the horse is dead.
  • Proclaim that others ride exactly this type of horse successfully.
  • Proclaim that riders that refuse to ride the dead horse are lazy, have no ambition and are not “all-in” – then replace them.
  • Reminisce elaborately on all the good times you had while riding that horse.
  • Hire consultants.
  • Proclaim boldly: “This horse is not dead, but alive!”
  • Hire more consultants.
  • Increase funding and/or training to increase the dead horse’s performance.
  • Ride the dead horse “outside the box.”
  • Make the dead horse shareholder. Threaten to cur the horse’s bonus.
  • Get the horse a Web site and social media visibility.
  • Kill all the other horses so the dead one doesn’t stand out.
  • Pronounce that the dead horse doesn’t need food, water or care, carries lower overhead and is less costly, and therefore contributes substantially more to the bottom line than other horses.
  • Rewrite the performance requirements for all horses.
  • Promote the dead horse to a supervisory position.
  • Name the dead horse, “paradigm shift” and keep riding it.
  • Ride the dead horse “smarter, not harder.”
  • Call the dead horse “Innovate” and keep on riding it.
  • Point out that the dead horse produces less manure and thus fewer climate damaging gasses. Keep on riding it.
  • Declare “God told us to ride this horse.”
  • Hire more consultants.

Filed under: Uncategorized

Guess which town I visited in the fall? Pölser, kjötbullar & …oumph!

A bit of rain, a small room in a quaint hotel in the old town – that was Stockholm! Bicyclists raced through the streets, endangering tourists and themselves. I had a chance to try out oumph, a soy-based veggie substance that tastes surprisingly good, but which is up to now only available in the Nordics.


Filed under: Uncategorized

Guess which town I visited in the fall? Pölser, kjötbullar & …oumph!

A bit of rain, a small room in a quaint hotel in the old town – that was Stockholm! Bicyclists raced through the streets, endangering tourists and themselves. I had a chance to try out oumph, a soy-based veggie substance that tastes surprisingly good, but which is up to now only available in the Nordics.


Filed under: Uncategorized